More Mineral Exploration in the Upper Peninsula

Mineral Exploration in Michigan's Upper Peninsula

Save the Wild UP–an environmental group organizing opposition to a proposed sulfide mine in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula–is reporting that Kennecott Minerals (who is pursuing the sulfide mine) and another company, Trans Superior Resources, are currently looking for uranium and metallic minerals in the Ottawa National Forest.

Save the Wild UP writes:

“Kennecott is pursuing three separate project areas located within the Ottawa. According to a Forest Service scoping letter, the company is looking for “all base and precious metals and other precious and semi-precious minerals”. The 640-acre “Watersmeet” parcel is located roughly four miles southeast of Watersmeet; the 200-acre “Haight” parcel is located roughly 8 miles northwest of Watersmeet; and the 395-acre “Bates” parcel is located on Perch Lake, roughly 20 miles north of the town of Iron River.

Trans Superior is also pursuing three parcels, totaling 920 acres in an attempt to locate “nickel, copper, cobalt, platinum, palladium and associated minerals.” All are located just east of Prickett Lake and roughly 8 miles southwest of the town of Baraga. The company had previously obtained federal uranium prospecting permits from the Ottawa for exploration activities adjacent to the Sturgeon River Gorge Wilderness as well as for locations east and northeast of Lake Gogebic. The new Prickett Lake projects are immediately to the northeast of the Sturgeon Wilderness.”

Both companies have been heavily involved in mining projects in the Upper Peninsula. Trans Superior’s parent company, Bitterroot Resources, has a joint venture agreement with the uranium mining company Cameco.

Public comment is currently being accepted and will be accepted indefinitely during the current “scoping” period. Once the forest service completes an environmental assessment for the projects, there will be another 30-day comment period.

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Author: mediamouse

Grand Rapids independent media // mediamouse.org