Study Links Dioxin Contamination to Breast Cancer

A new study has linked dioxin contamination in Midland, Michigan to increased instances of breast cancer. The research examines an area where Dow Chemical has polluted.

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A new study published in Environmental Health has found that women who live in dioxin-contaminated areas in Midland, Michigan and in the Tittabawassee River floodplain have increased levels of breast cancer. Midland-based Dow Chemical has been responsible for dioxin contamination in the area.

From the study:

“Background

High levels of dioxins in soil and higher-than-average body burdens of dioxins in local residents have been found in the city of Midland and the Tittabawassee River floodplain in Michigan. The objective of this study is threefold: (1) to evaluate dioxin levels in soils; (2) to evaluate the spatial variations in breast cancer incidence in Midland, Saginaw, and Bay Counties in Michigan; (3) to evaluate whether breast cancer rates are spatially associated with the dioxin contamination areas.

Results

High levels of dioxin in soils were observed in the city of Midland and the Tittabawassee River 100-year floodplain. After adjusting for age, we observed high breast cancer incidence rates and detected the presence of spatial clusters in the city of Midland, the confluence area of the Tittabawassee, and Saginaw Rivers. After accounting for spatiotemporal variations, we observed a spatial cluster of breast cancer incidence in Midland between 1985 and 1993. The odds ratio further suggests a statistically significant (alpha = 0.05) increased breast cancer rate as women get older, and a higher disease burden in Midland and the surrounding areas in close proximity to the dioxin contaminated areas.

Conclusions

These findings suggest that increased breast cancer incidences are spatially associated with soil dioxin contamination. Aging is a substantial factor in the development of breast cancer. Findings can be used for heightened surveillance and education, as well as formulating new study hypotheses for further research.”

Author: mediamouse

Grand Rapids independent media // mediamouse.org